Andy's Equine Art Home
Andy's Equine Art
Andrea Hartmeyer Johns
THE CONTEMPORARY PORTRAIT

If Interested in Commissioning a Portrait

You will have a BLAST from start to finish.

Each painting is totally unique and so much fun.

Visits with the artist can be in person, via phone, email, private messages, etc..

The more photos and other resource materials submitted, the better. The final painting will likely not look like any single photo. The artist will take the very best features from every resource and mentally take that to the painting, perfectly unique and fabulous. Ears back? No problem. Hocks lagging? No problem. Andy does not need the "perfect photo."

Her extensive equine background assures the client that the subject(s) will be at their optimum. Clarity of the photos is most important - especially the human face – and the horse's musculature, build. If Andy is at a horse show where the subject will be preforming, she will watch the class and/or visit the horse in the stall, or she can make farm visits. The ultimate goal is for Andy to understand exactly what the client wants - even if the client doesn’t know; she can help you figure out what you (or your to be surprised loved ones) want.

Fees are based on the projected time required for completion, and more dependent on scope than size. Including the human face in the painting increases the fee the most, because faces are basically shadow and highlight, proportion and expression with no room for error. While complicated, wonderful faces full of life are the hallmark of Andy's portraits. They are accurate –even if using unrealistic color.

Andy brings to the easel a lifetime of knowledge of the horses. Other pets (dogs, cats, birds) are not approached as breed standards, and as such require less time to complete. (Simple pet portraits start at $695). Simple small horse-only portraits are afforded significantly more time because they are not just cute pets; they must be accurate and embodied with great detail.

Most of these paintings, done totally by hand, take several months to complete and range from around $2,000 to $12,000 depending on the complexity of the composition. Larger canvases and the inclusion of harness, buggies, viceroys, wagons, etc., add additional time, materials, and expense. Many times the scope of the painting can be modified to retrofit into a budget. For example, sometimes a ribbon can cover a hand, thus eliminating perhaps several days at the easel. The artist will help you.

Almost nobody who visits Andy's booth knows that she competed at the highest levels as a junior exhibitor and amateur, winning multiple Saddle Seat medals, and top ribbons at Lexington and Louisville.

See below...

Andy knows the thrill of that once in a lifetime sensational ride, and relives it vicariously with her client as she paints. When asked about this she replied, "I really do. I totally share the joy of that rider in my painting. All my senses come alive... the smells, sounds of the announcers and crowds, going through the chute at Louisville, seeing in person all of the famous people only seen in photos before, the barns, jog carts, warm up rings, etc.."

Andy looks forward to working with every client and creating a painting that will be treasured for countless generations. It is a privilege.

Andy's Personal Show Career


Andy on Fortune on Parade
winning the Amateur 3 Gaited Championship, Dayton, c 1974
She was third in the Five Gaited Amateur World Championship on Commander's Stonewall in 1973. Julianne Schmutz was 4th on Gold Treat.
Brenden Heintz posted this picture on Facebook in his Around the Arena: Horse Show Nostalgia on Facebook and tagged Andy. Andy had never seen it!!! Her comments:

"Brendan, this is dear Starlighter who was Dad's harness horse from age 3 thru age 13 . . . not yet keen to the curb bit! He was our beloved pet, whom we eventually rode triple bareback through the pond and eventually did figure eights at the canter in the jog cart. So lucky to have had him in our lives. Wonderful American Saddlebred family member. I still think of him almost every day."

Andy winning on an exchanged horse at Dayton 1971. She showed at Dayton every year from time she was in 10 & under.

"The three presenters are Crabtree girls from the younger division. Kim Barnes in middle and Debbie Cowan on the right. Not sure of one on the left."

"Here I am on Starlighter winning the eq stake at Fort Wayne 1971 which was a good size show in those days. I won an ASHA Medal class on him too. He was about 16.3 but small barreled. Impeccable breeding, but we never had him with a well known trainer. Bob Whitney had him at the beginning, so he got a good start. He was the horse that brought Dad into our horse world too. Before driving Starlighter he went to Notre Dame football games every weekend. (As Bill Marple will tell you, we all held our breath when he showed :)."
Andy winning the Equitation Stake at LaPorte 1972 riding Pat Perkins. Andrea Walton is presenting the Gloriann Stonewall Challenge trophy.

Pat Perkins had been Debbie Cowan's equitation horse but he tended to rear... "which is why we got him. He was deserving of his reputation. He never went over with me but he broke Ellis Waggoner's leg and knocked him out of most of the 1972 show season and bit other horses in the van. "



Commissioned portraits...

Inquiries: email Andy or call 214.697.0253 or 972.960.0207

Andy Johns
PO Box 833374
Richardson, TX 75083

Currently VISA, Mastercard, checks and money orders are accepted.


Artwork is not to be reproduced without written permission of the artist.

All rights reserved by Andrea Hartmeyer Johns, 2017

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